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need to bring more oversight into what is going on at nsa? i support aggressive oversight of the intelligence community. this is the deal we struck as a country. we have democracy. it is not necessarily completely in harmony with an aggressive intelligence community. we have had to set up institutions and structures where we try to balance these competing national interest. in thethe ways we did it 70's was to create intelligence communities and ensure that all --bers of each community was ultimately it is the president's call. they help make a judgment about what politically we are able to achieve in terms of intelligence collection. . host: if you have questions for our guest, you can call in on the phone lines -- if you want to send us an e- .ail, we will take those momentarily. michael allen speaking global strategy hearing d.c.. he is also an author of "linking red." has intelligence gathering and sharing got better after 9/11? guest: absolutely. we have rebuilt the intelligence infrastructure so we can share information better. this is what my book
national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> is a tough time for nsa. we say, it is much more important for this country that we defend this nation and take than it is to give up a program that would result in this nation being attacked. we would rather be here in front of you today, telling you why we defended these programs, then having given them up and have our nation or our allies be attacked and people killed. >> this weekend on c-span, intelligence officials defend the nsa surveillance programs. 10:00 a.m.rning at eastern. live sunday on c-span 2. kelly.lls for kitty on c-span 3 "american history tv," each weekend in november, remembering john f. kennedy. eyewitness accounts. john foster dulles had recently died when that super airport out of chantilly, virginia was being built. president eisenhower announced the airport would be named dulles airport. when kennedy took over, he did not want to name that for a crusty old warrior. finally, the decision was made to name it after dulles. you can still see the clip of kennedy opening the airport with eisenhower there and allen dulles
-ed in "the l.a. times." you called for changes to be made to the nsa's massive phone data gathering program and say it's the evidence that it has made us safer is limited. instead it appears that the utility of the metadata program has been conflated with the success of other collection efforts. how do you determine how much surveillance, then, is too much? >> i think we have to weigh what is the size of the program, what is the magnitude of the collection and what are the results it's getting? and even more than that, even if it met that test, even if the metadata program was very successful, we also have to ask, is it necessary to collect all this data or can the program be restructured? in my view, the program can be restructured in a way that has the telecommunications providers retain their own data. i doesn't require the government to get all that data. when we suspect that a phone number is connected to a plot, then we go to the phone company, much as we would do in a criminal investigation. so i think we can get the same information we need. we can continue to protect the country. w
that nsa leaker edward snowden could be granted clemency. i want to bring in benjamin carden. senator carden, glad to have you here, sir. >> alex, good to be with you. >> edward snowden released what he called this manifesto for the truth. he says current debates about spying just prove his revelations are helping bring about change. what's your response to that? >> mr. snowden has caused real damage to this country. the manner in which he has conducted these releases have compromised our national security. as senator feinstein said, there's a way in which a whistleblower can get information to us. we want to make sure there's adequate oversight on the powers of the intelligence community. we need the right balance to keep us safe and protect the rights of americans. so there's concern on how we collect data, but for a person who has been given that access and trust on his own to do this type of release is detrimental to our country. >> sir, as you serve on the senate foreign relations committee, i know you're privy to things we are not necessarily. do you believe what we know so far
- called nsa spying concerns. do you have an update, and do you think these meetings have improve relations between the u.s. and the eu? >> there's no question that the kind of communication we have had with the european allies have been very important and very useful when it comes to making clear how much we value the kind of security cooperation that our nations have and that we have with europe in general. comes toal when it keeping americans safe, when it comes to keeping our european allies safe. there are the tensions that of been caused by these disclosures are ones that we knowledge and ones that we are addressing directly in our communications with european nations and other nations who have been part of the disclosures. >> [indiscernible] >> i would not speak for any european nation or any other allied nation, but we believe the kind of medication that we have engaged in has been effective and useful in making we value those relationships, how important our cooperation is when it comes to national security issues and intelligence matters and how much more broad our relations veryb
if they will be charged. the cause is still under investigation. nsa leaker edward snowden has a message for the u.s. stop treating me like a trader. -- traitor. snowden is under temporary asylum in russia for leaking the nsa's secret playbook and faces espionage charges in the u.s. tucker. >> hey, clayton what needs to be done to prevent these kind of attacks. jonathan gillian. thank you for joining thus morning. >> good to be with you. >> i want to put up on the scene -- screen. there have been couple of shootings. gunman killed himself in houston. 2010, new orleans, one dead, one wounded and famously in los angeles 2002, two dead and three wounded. do you see a pattern here? >> well, obviously we see a pattern of individuals that are drawn to this for some reason. i'm not exactly clear why people who have rage are drawn to this. but, yeah, we definitely do see an issue with this. and i think probably one of the things that allows people to go there and do or draws them there is the access to the airport. and the importance of the airport. so they probably look at this as something that almost like a go
't get enough. especially now we're talking about nsa and spying and i can't think of a more appropriate time for this. i'm fascinated by the individuals behind these actions here. >> the secret 6? >> the actual secret six. agent 355, there is a female spy. >> yes. >> we still don't know her name. tell us about her. >> what you have is six spies in the middle of the war, we almost lost the entire thing out of new york. washington gets blown out of new york, we're down to 3,000 men. so he says to get back into new york and take on 40,000 british, i have to set autopsy spy ring. so he's got to find someone who knows new york city. so he gets his trusted lieutenant, talmadge, and he says, listen, find some people we can trust. we've got to get into new york. i got to find out what's going on. one of the people he gets is this agent 355. all we know is she's a lady and she infiltrated the social scene, like you picture in new york city now and she listened and she actually interacted, went to the parties where she overheard people talking about a general ready to give up west point, she ends
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)